Days Gone By…

The March flood of 1913, known as the largest natural disaster in Ohio, affected nearly every corner of the state. Rainfall statewide totaled between 6 and 11 inches. Beginning on March 21, a total of 10 inches of rain fell on Ashland within four days. The Miami River experienced the most severe flooding in the state. Dayton suffered to the extent that the National Guard was called in for cleanup operations. In Ashland, the areas surrounding Main and Center Street suffered much damage, as the town creek flows mainly through those corridors. Ashland was not alone in the devastation caused by the 1913 flood. The Cuyahoga River washed away docks, lumberyards, trains, and rail yards in the Cleveland area. Levees along the Ohio River at Portsmouth were topped, flooding 4,500 homes. Since that time, a system of flood control reservoirs has been established by conservancy districts across the state. In some parts of the state, officials dynamited canal locks in an attempt to alleviate flooding. The destruction of the locks ensured the permanent end to canal transportation. Shown in the photos below are the ruins of the Cleaning and Dye Works, which tumbled into the town creek near the Center Street Bridge; and water rushing through the East Main Street corridor near Arthur Street.

One of the goals of the Ashland County Historical Society is to educate our community about the people and events that have shaped our history. This page will be updated periodically with photos that commemorate and honor the important people, places and events that have contributed to our county’s rich history. Many of these photos are taken from the books written by Chris Box, Director of the Ashland County Historical Society. The books, "Images of America, Ashland" and "Postcard History Series, Ashland," are available in our gift shop.